Department

Philosophy

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

7-2015

Abstract

Philosophers have used the terms ‘impersonal’ and ‘personal value’ to refer to, among other things, whether something’s value is universal or particular to an individual. In this paper, I propose an account of impersonal value that, I argue, better captures the intuitive distinction than potential alternatives, while providing conceptual resources for moving beyond the traditional stark dichotomy. I illustrate the practical importance of my theoretical account with reference to debate over the evaluative scope of cultural heritage.

Comments

Penultimate draft, 6/16/14. Final published version: Ethics, Vol. 125, No. 4 (July 2015), 999-1027, doi: 10.1086/680908.

Version

Post-print

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